8 Locks You Might Have Forgotten About

8 Locks You Might Have Forgotten About

The invention of locks dates to the Greek era. In those times, locks were carved from wood and used multiple pins with huge wooden keys that matched the placement of the pins. Advancement came in the Roman era when Roman engineers started using metal to forge locks. When their empire fell, it resulted in the halt of any additional locking mechanism inventions.

From this point onwards, only improvements to previously-invented locks were made. Then, finally, in the late eighteenth-century and during the nineteenth-century lock invention got into a new stride that would shape lock invention for years to come.

Here is a list of locks you might have forgotten about:

8 Locks You Might Have Forgotten About

1. Double-Acting Tumbler Lock

You might have forgotten about this style of lock because it was invented in 1778 by Robert Barron who received a patent for it. A tumbler is similar to a lever, and this lock consisted of two levers. These levers were required to be raised to different heights (that were only known to the user) so that the bolt holding the lock could be withdrawn. It is an invention that has been used to detail and influence the structure of present-day locks.

8 Locks You Might Have Forgotten About

2. The Bramah Lock (Precision Lock)

Joseph Bramah was a brilliant English inventor whose inventions ranged from beer pumps to the hydraulic press. However, what often stands out is his invention of a lock that proved to be theft proof for almost 70 years. This lock was so good that it was dubbed the ‘Challenge Lock’ until it was eventually picked. The key and keyhole of the Bramah lock were both circular. The key was jagged at the front end and formed slots which needed to fit perfectly into the lock to open it. The more the slots a key had meant it was harder to pick.

8 Locks You Might Have Forgotten About

3. George Davis Patent Lock

In 1799, George Davis, a locksmith from Windsor, England invented the ‘double chambered lock.’ It consisted of an upper chamber and a lower chamber. A key was rotated in the upper chamber in order to enter the lower chamber where the actual lock was. The purpose of the two chambers was to hide the inner workings in the lower chamber and keep it more secure. It was used mostly on government boxes. For an extra fee, Mr. Davis would even engrave the inner lock plates with text that offered a reward to any locksmith who turned in a person trying to make a replacement key.

8 Locks You Might Have Forgotten About

4. The Detector Lock

This lock was invented by Jeremiah Chubb in 1784 after the British government issued a pricy challenge to all locksmiths to invent a burglarproof lock. You can guess who won the prize – Jeremiah Chubb with the Chubb detector lock. It was a lever lock with a detector lever that would detect a foreign key and instantly lock the entire mechanism. Only the original key could free up the newly-bound lock.

8 Locks You Might Have Forgotten About

5. The Parautoptic Lock

The parautoptic lock was made by the Day and Newell company but was actually the property of Chubbs manufactures. What they did was add a protector patent and a spring-loaded wiper to the existing lock. You may not have heard of this lock but probably heard of Alfred C. Hobbs who was the leading salesman of Day and Newell and also the best lockpicker of all time. In 1851, Hobbs traveled to England and picked both the detector lock and the challenge lock (almost 7 decades after its invention), both for money and salesmanship.

8 Locks You Might Have Forgotten About

6. Warded Locks

Warded locks are ancient locks that date back to the Chinese and Roman empires. You can find them in modern day Europe used on monument doors and old churches. Warded locks, however, are not the most secure of locks and are used on low-security applications.

8 Locks You Might Have Forgotten About

7. Yale Lock

You can say the Yale lock is the father of most modern-day locks. Linus Yale Sr., of Stamford, Connecticut, was the inventor of the first pin tumbler cylinder lock, but it was his son, Yale Jr., who perfected the lock. It was in 1848 that the Yale Cylinder lock was invented. This invention changed lock manufacturing forever, and you now use his patented pin tumbler design on padlocks, door locks, and vehicle doors.

8 Locks You Might Have Forgotten About

8. Felter Lock

You might have never heard of a wafer tumbler lock before. It was patented in 1868 by Philo Felter and manufactured in Cazenovia, New York. This lock used flat wafers that prevented the lock from opening unless the right key was inserted. A wafer tumbler lock is similar to a pin tumbler lock.  However, with a wafer lock, each wafer is a single piece whereas each pin is made of two or more pieces.

And there you have it!  A list of eight interesting locks from history that you might have never heard of or might have even forgotten about.

Location:

53 S Main St #3
Alpharetta, GA 30009

 

Follow Us